Blawg Review

It's not just a blog carnival; it's the law! ~ a fool in the forest

Blawg Review OneWebDay

Welcome to OneWebDay at Blawg Review.

Blawg Review #178 is being hosted today at Freedom to Differ, the law blog of Peter Black, a lecturer at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia. Peter’s research interests focus on legal issues relating to the regulation of the media and the internet. He is a regular contributor to the Internet Law Bulletin and The Business of Law from FindLaw Australia. Peter currently has a contract with Idea Group Publishing to edit a book with Kelley Burton titled Legal and Political Issues of Blogging: Surviving in the Blogosphere.

It's perhaps not surprising that Peter Black was scheduled to host Blawg Review on this day. September 22, 2008 is also One Web Day:
OneWebDay is an Earth Day for the internet. The idea behind OneWebDay is to focus attention on a key internet value (this year, online participation in democracy), focus attention on local internet concerns (connectivity, censorship, individual skills), and create a global constituency that cares about protecting and defending the internet. So, think of OneWebDay as an environmental movement for the Internet ecosystem. It’s a platform for people to educate and activate others about issues that are important for the Internet’s future.
To learn more about One Web Day click here.

On the third annual “Earth Day for the Internet”, communities across the country are holding events to learn about and advocate for that marvel of modern infrastructure, the Internet. It happens in the United States and around the world on OneWebDay, Monday, September 22, 2008.
“Earth Day was the model when I founded OneWebDay in 2006,” says Susan Crawford, a professor of law specializing in Internet issues at the University of Michigan. “In 1969, one man asked the people to do what their elected representatives would not: take the future of the environment into their own hands.” By 1972, the United States had a federal agency devoted to protecting the environment, the E.P.A., and today a worldwide citizens’ movement has put the environment front and center politically. According to Crawford, “peoples’ lives now are as dependent on the Internet as they are on the basics like roads, energy supplies and running water. We can no longer take that for granted and we must advocate for the Internet politically, and support its vitality personally.”
The Internet has also become the means by which citizens around the world build movements to hold their elected leaders accountable and support those who represent their interests; it is also increasingly the medium through which citizens interact with their governments. The theme of this year’s OneWebDay is online participation in democracy, coinciding with the U.S. elections.

Watch for a special election-eve Blawg Review this year on Monday, November 3, at The Faculty Lounge.

Blawg Review is the blog carnival for everyone interested in law. A peer-reviewed blog carnival, the host of each Blawg Review decides which of the submissions and recommended posts are suitable for inclusion in the presentation. And the host is encouraged to source another dozen or so interesting posts to fit with any special theme of that issue of Blawg Review. The host's personal selections usually include several that reflect the character and subject interests of the host blawg, recognizing that the regular readership of the blog should find some of the usual content, and new readers of the blog via Blawg Review ought to get some sense of the unique perspective and subject specialties of the host. Thanks to all the law bloggers who collaborate to make Blawg Review one of the very best blog carnivals of any genre.

Being the anonymous editor of Blawg Review, the Internet has changed my life in ways I cannot tell. LOL